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In an attempt to put the patient first in healthcare, Congress and President Obama in 2015 approved a bipartisan bill for United States healthcare reform. The bill is known as “Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015,” or MACRA. Among the major provisions of MACRA is the Quality Payment Program. Under the Quality Payment Program, physicians and nurses receive positive, neutral or negative Medicare payment adjustments based upon a “Patient Satisfaction Score,” that is, patient satisfaction scores have a direct impact on how physicians, physician assistants, nurses, and hospital’s get paid by Medicare. Managing the broader healthcare goal of “Improving the Quality and Effectiveness of Patient Care” from a single, highly generalized measure is a major concern for physicians and hospitals. These “patient satisfaction scores” can drive unintended patient tr... (more)

The Three Phases of Digital Transformation | @ExpoDX #DX #AI #BigData #Analytics

The research firm Technology Business Research (TBR) recently came out with a report titled, “Winning The Business Of Digital Transformation Services Requires A Process-Led Approach” authored by Sebastian Lagana and Jennifer Hamel. The report is full of good nuggets, but I especially liked the way that they categorized the 3 phases of Digital Transformation: Substitution represents basic IT modernization; such as leveraging new consumption models (e.g., cloud, “as a Service”) to directly replace functions and costs that already exist in an enterprise. Shifting from on-premises to cloud can generate tangible cost savings for an organization; however, it does not have a large impact on how an organization goes to market, better serves their customers or optimizes their key business processes. Extension is where disruptive technologies (e.g., data science, artificial ... (more)

Isaac Asimov: The 4th Law of Robotics | @ThingsExpo #AI #ML #DX #DigitalTransformation

Like me, I’m sure that many of you nerds have read the book “I, Robot.” “I, Robot” is the seminal book written by Isaac Asimov (actually it was a series of books, but I only read the one) that explores the moral and ethical challenges posed by a world dominated by robots. But I read that book like 50 years ago, so the movie “I, Robot” with Will Smith is actually more relevant to me today. The movie does a nice job of discussing the ethical and moral challenges associated with a society where robots play such a dominant and crucial role in everyday life. Both the book and the movie revolve around the “Three Laws of Robotics,” which are: A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. A robot must protect ... (more)

How to Power #DigitalTransformation | @CloudExpo #DX #IoT #SmartCities

“You can’t stop the incessant march of economics” – Bill Schmarzo Okay, so it’s probably not cool to quote oneself, but hey, this is my blog and I get to do what I want.  And for anyone who follows me knows, I love to “riff” on the game-changing power of economics.  The “economics of big data” – where the cost to store, manage and analyze data is 20x to 100x cheaper than traditional analytics – started this big data and data science craze.  But ultimately it is the economics of value, or to be specific, “value in use” where the economics really become a game changer. I recent article titled “The Simple Economics of Machine Intelligence” from the Harvard Business Review highlights very well the role that economics (maybe even more than data science) is going to play in separating the winners from the losers in digital transformation.  To quote the article: Machine int... (more)

Me, Myself and Digital Twins | @ThingsExpo #AI #IoT #BigData #DX #DigitalTransformation

It’s hard to get into the world of the Internet of Things (IoT) without eventually talking about Digital Twins. I was first exposed to the concept of Digital Twins when working with GE. Great concept. But are Digital Twins only relevant to physical machines such as wind turbines, jet engines, and locomotives? What can we learn about the concept of digital twins that we can apply more broadly – to other physical entities (like contracts and agreements) and even humans? What Is a Digital Twin? A Digital Twin is a digital representation of an industrial asset that enables companies to better understand and predict the performance of their machines, find new revenue streams, and change the way their business operates[1]. GE uses the concept of Digital Twins to create a digital replica of their physical product (e.g., wind turbine, jet engine, locomotive) that captures ... (more)

It’s About Economics! Data Is the New Sun | @ThingsExpo #AI #DX #BigData

I’ve always felt that bringing an economics perspective to our Big Data and digital transformation discussions is more important than a traditional accounting or even information technology (IT) perspective. Heck, I believe that a Chief Data Officer’s background should be more along the lines of economics than IT. Economics brings a forward-looking perspective on creating value (wealth). In fact, economics is defined as “the branch of knowledge concerned with the production, consumption, and transfer (capture) of wealth.” It is this forward-looking perspective on the “production, consumption, and transfer (capture) of wealth” that should drive an organization’s digital transformation initiatives. And as an example of how digital transformation is exploiting economics, we need to look no further than what is happening in the automobile industry. Economics of an Elec... (more)

The Four Laws of #DigitalTransformation | @CloudExpo @Schmarzo #AI #DX #IoT #SmartCities

My discussions with organizations looking to “digitally transform” themselves is yielding some interesting observations. I expect that when these discussions move into the execution phase, we will start to create some “Laws of Digital Transformation” that will guide organizations digital transformation journey. So with that in mind, let me start by proposing these “4 Laws of Digital Transformation”. Law #1: It’s About Business Models, Not Just The Business Digital Transformation is about innovating business models, not just optimizing business processes Organizations are looking to leverage these digital assets to create new “economic moats.” Warren Buffett, the investor extraordinaire, popularized the term “economic moat.” “Economic moat” refers to a business’s ability to maintain competitive advantages over its competitors (through process and technology innovatio... (more)

Golden State Warriors Analytics Exercise | @BigDataExpo #BigData #Analytics

For a recent University of San Francisco MBA class, I wanted to put my students in a challenging situation where they would be forced to make difficult data science trade-offs between gathering data, preparing the data and performing the actual analysis. The purpose of the exercise was to test their ability to “think like a data scientist” with respect to identifying and quantifying variables that might be better predictors of performance. The exercise would require them to: Set up a basic analytic environment Gather and organize different data sources Explore the data using different visualization techniques Create and test composite metrics by grouping and transforming base metrics Create a score or analytic model that supports their recommendations I gave them the links to 10 Warrior games (5 regulation wins, 3 overtime losses and 2 regulation losses) as their star... (more)

Understanding Chaos Theory | @ThingsExpo #DX #BI #IoT #M2M #Analytics

Why Understanding Chaos Theory Is Important to Your Business “Chaos: When the present determines the future, but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future.” – Edward Lorenz We all probably remember the movie (“Jurassic Park”), even if we don’t remember this exact scene: Dr. Malcolm, played by Jeff Goldblum is explaining Chaos Theory to Dr. Ellie Sattler, played by Laura Dern. Dr. Malcolm is explaining how random, seemingly negligible events can disrupt even the most carefully laid out plans. Dr. Ian Malcolm: [after the T-Rex failed to appear for the tour group]. “You see a Tyrannosaur doesn’t follow a set pattern or park schedules, the essence of chaos.” And then later in the movie… Dr. Ian Malcolm: “Oh, yeah. Oooh, ahhh, that’s how it always starts. Then later there’s running and um, screaming.” Yes, running and screaming. That’s what hap... (more)

What Is #DigitalTransformation? | @ThingsExpo #AI #DX #IoT #SmartCities

For a phrase that’s being thrown around a lot recently, what does “Digital Transformation” really mean? When someone says that they want to digitally transform their business, what does one really mean, why do they want to do it, and should they approach this “digital transformation” process? First off, let’s start with a definition. If we don’t know what we are trying to achieve, then how do we know how to get there? Or to quote the famous Greek philosopher Yogi Berra: “If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.” In a recent blog “How To Achieve Digital Transformation,” I stated with the following definition of Digital Transformation: “The coupling of granular, real-time data (e.g., smartphones, connected devices, smart appliances, wearables, mobile commerce, video surveillance) with modern technologies (e.g., cloud native apps, big data ... (more)

“Unlearn” to Unleash Your #DataLake | @CloudExpo @Schmarzo #BigData #AI #DX

It takes years – sometimes a lifetime – to perfect certain skills in life: hitting a jump shot off the dribble, nailing that double high C on the trumpet, parallel parking a Ford Expedition. Malcolm Gladwell wrote a book, “Outliers,” discussing the amount of work – 10,000 hours – required to perfect a skill (while the exactness of 10,000 hours has come under debate, it is still a useful point that people need to invest considerable time and effort to master a skill). But once we get comfortable with something that we feel that we have mastered, we become reluctant to change. We are reluctant to unlearn what we’ve taken so long to master. Changing your point of release on a jump shot or your embouchure for playing lead trumpet is dang hard! Why? Because it is harder to unlearn that it is to learn. It is harder to un-wire all those synoptic nerve endings and deep mem... (more)